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Day 4 – Hawes to Keld

Day 4 – Hawes to Keld

Area: Yorkshire Dales
Starting point: Hawes
Ending point: Keld
Date of walk: 11th May 2016
Trails: Pennine Way
Distance: 12.03 miles
Difficulty: Moderate
Terrain: Mountain & road walking
Weather: Sunny & cloudy

Really getting into the swing of things now. Body seems to be getting stronger by the day & experiencing this ever changing environment which I am walking through is truly a blessing. I opt for the later start this morning, as I need to visit the village pharmacy for some Sudocrem & an outdoor shop to try a different walking sock. I’m out and about in the village by 8am, but the shops don’t open til 9. So i pay a visit to the church. As I enter I’m greeted by a kind lady, I take a brief walk around before sitting down in uninterrupted silence for the hour. Quiet meditation & prayer is how my days are always started, and to be in this little village church is serene. I exit joyous, and thank the kind lady for her hospitality.

Hawes Church
Hawes Church
Hawes
Hawes

An unusual start to the day, I follow the pennine way. The pennine way, the pennine way, I’ll be dreaming about the pennine way months after this week. But I loose track and vier of it slightly. I either walk back, or I cut across farms over dry stone walls to reach back onto it. The 2nd seems the quicker option. Something happened today which I wasn’t expecting. As I was cutting across the fields. 1 of the fields was full of sheep, they all mysteriously looked at me. The look in their eyes is somewhat suspicious, there is 30 odd of them & 1 of me. I walk quietly along the walk trying not to disturb them, especially in this time of lambing. But, all of a sudden, kabang, they all come close, than eventually start charging. I flee like a bullet leaving the gun of its chamber & quickly climb and hop over a wall. Talk about getting the blood pumping first thing. You really start to think to yourself, where did I go wrong in life when you’re getting bullied by sheep.

Today’s walk it pretty much all about going over the Great Shunner Fell, another pretty incredible mountain. I first reach the village of Hardraw where I find a pub called the green dragon with this sign outside..

Today is more of a stroll, than a hike, even up the Great Shunner Fell. To get to the top of Great Shunner fell takes a bit of time however, as soon as you think you’re at the top, you’re not and you see another summit. That’s the running theme, they may aswel have named this one ‘blind summit’. Sun is back out in full force again & I walk alone. As I reach the top, I stop for lunch. What spectacular far reaching views from this one.

Great Shunner Fell
Great Shunner Fell
Great Shunner Fell
Great Shunner Fell

I stop and talk to a couple, an interesting conversation. They are from Nottingham, and they decide to want to talk to me about the poverty from in the major cities of London and Nottingham. ‘Really?’ I think to myself, you want to talk about this now, on top of this hill, on your holiday, you want to talk about this. Anyway, I briefly entertain the conversation. There is silence, followed by the question ‘Are you in or out’? And by that they mean the EU Referendum. I literally laugh out loud, I’m in hysterics, than I realize it was a serious question. I compose myself once again, and simply say ‘I walk up mountains, camp in forests, help myself and those around me, but voting, voting is something I do not do’. It’s all a very serious conversation on top of this mountain, I try to get a chuckle out of them, but a half hearted smile is all that is shown. Never the less, I ask to join them on there walk down, and we all continue down. We reach the bottom, They continue on the pennine way & I take the high road into Keld…

Angram village on the high road to Keld
Angram village on the high road to Keld
Angram
Angram
Day 3 – Malham to Hawes

Day 3 – Malham to Hawes

Area: Yorkshire Dales
Starting point: Malham
Ending point: Hawes
Date of walk: 10th May 2016
Trails: Pennine Way, Dales way, A Pennine Journey
Distance: 22.49 miles
Difficulty: Hard
Terrain: Straight up Dales, mountains, road walking
Weather: Sun, light clouds

Spending time alone, walking, walking, and more walking, up and down through the hills & valleys. Expectably people ask on the way why I go for such long walks. The short answer is, because is brings me true happiness. And this day, reflects strongly this. Spending time alone can get more and more difficult by the untold amount of reasons, especially in this day and age. However, ultimately in the end the choice is ours as to what we do. If we are not there in person with another, we are there on the phone, connected via some sort of device. Which is great. However, whats often forgotten, is that everything is contained in spirit. Walking alone, step by step, being present & focused is good walking & a good way to be reminded of those things which are truly important. When walking through bleak moors and the sometimes annoying dales, I personally learn a lot about myself & my connections with people and how they affect me. Know Thy Self. The body is alone, with none other but the sheep, cows and beetles on the floor. But in spirit all is connected.

For no particular reason, today is a day I’ll never forget. One of those days, that by the end of it, you tap yourself on the back and say well done. I woke up at the crack of dawn, feet are getting more blistered by the day. But today that doesn’t seem to matter. A long walk ahead, but today I’m not focused on the end, or how many miles I need to cover, I’m focused on the now. The present moment.

Malham itself is a popular village located in the heart of the Pennines. As I exit Malham on the Pennine Way I first reach Malham Cove, which is a steep climb upto the top. Today, thank god for clouds. Today they nicely block the scorching sun, and that gentle breeze well needed. I walk amongst 3 major trails, and alot of unmarked one’s today. It’s one of those as the crow flies days, up and over a few mountains.

dav
Approaching Malham Cove
Looking back over Malham
Looking back over Malham

For another couple of miles I come across a glacial lake called Malham Tarn which is the highest lake in England. Pretty windy up here & the lake does look grand..

Highest lake in England
Highest lake in England 

From Malham Tarn, we only go higher, onto our first mountain of the day, Fountains Fell. This is spectacular, a beautiful mountain in a beautiful part of the world..

View going up Cross fells
View going up Cross fells 

I bump into some helpful locals on top of Cross fells, they help me plan out a good route on my map to my destination of Hawes. They also kindly offer to take a photo of me by the Cairn..

Caaiirrrrnnn
Caaiirrrrnnn

On the way down, Pen – Y – Ghant seen in the distance..

Pen Y Ghant
Pen Y Ghant seen from cross fells

At the foot of Cross fells, I turn right with a bit of road walking, my 1st time off the Pennine way and get out the map and compass for some orienteering across unmarked, barely pathed moors. I walk down the road less traveled, crossing more bleakness, through territory people rarely walk down. You can generally tell by the way the animals behave. The sheep are acting strange, extremely defensive, and giving it the large. I don’t think I’ve ever been moved on by sheep before! well what do you know, Fearless sheep. It’s lambing season, so they are protecting their young.

Lambs pon road
Lambs pon road 

I reach the tiny hamlet of Halton Gill, near enough the half way point for the day. I sit and rest, eat some oatbran cake and head out of the village on a trail called A Pennine Journey. Although I’m only this for 10 minute until I branch off over the fells back down into another little village called Oughtershaw. I bump into 3 ladies walking the Dales Way, we slowly walk together. It’s moments like this, that really give you a push and bursts of energy come from nowhere. The 3 lovely ladies are from Matlock, Tansley to be more precise. They offer some encouragement, which I am grateful for. Than we part ways, I find out later on that evening they have donated for the cause. Puts a big smile on my face, 2 people so far on just passing by walking have now donated. They must see the weary look on my face, and my strange limping walk due to my blistered feet. Perhaps they take pity. haha. The rest of today is the road in Hawes for 5 miles, up and down again. Road walking is tricky, as it burns the feet a lot. But I grit and bear it, as I hoddle into another wonderful North Yorkshire village…

on the road into Hawes
on the road into Hawes
stumbling into Hawes
stumbling into Hawes